“History doesn’t repeat itself, but it does rhyme.”
— Mark Twain

Highlights of History, 1930 – The Boxer Rebellion #5 – The Scramble for China

Posted: September 2nd, 2015 | No Comments »

 

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Highlights of History, 1930 – The Boxer Rebellion #4 – Boxers Here, Boxers There, Boxers Everywhere….

Posted: September 1st, 2015 | No Comments »

 

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Highlights of History, 1930 – The Boxer Rebellion #3 – it’s Chinese Vs Foreigners and no mistake…

Posted: August 31st, 2015 | No Comments »

 

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Highlights of History, 1930 – The Boxer Rebellion #2 – and so to June 13th 1900…..

Posted: August 30th, 2015 | No Comments »

 

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Highlights of History 1930 – The Story of the Boxer Rebellion as Comic Strip

Posted: August 29th, 2015 | No Comments »

A little education, from 1930, on how the American newspapers presented the Boxer Rebellion. J Carroll Mansfield produced many Highlights of History comic strips that were syndicated in newspapers across America. Each historical story ran for a week or so.

Mansfield was born in 1896 in Baltimore, Maryland. He apparently realized at an early age that he wanted to pursue a career in art. He also had a strong interest in history, particularly American history. After serving in World War I in the 7th Infantry in Europe, he co-authored a history of the regiment, titled The Blue and the Grey. His illustrations were an integral part of the text. He later free-lanced for the Baltimore Sun Times. He started the Highlights of History comic strip in 1925.

Anyway, here we have the first strip in the series…I’ll post the next each day as the newspapers ran them in 1930.

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Goods from the East, 1600-1800: Trading Eurasia

Posted: August 29th, 2015 | No Comments »

A new collection of essays on trading with China – Goods from the East…..

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The imperative of the long-distance seaborne trade of Europeans, from the age of exploration, was to acquire the goods of the exotic East – the silks and porcelains and tea of China, the spices of the spice islands and the textiles of India. Goods from the East focuses on the trade in fine products: how they were made, marketed and distributed between Asia and Europe. This trade was conducted by East India Companies and many private traders, and the first Global Age that resulted deeply affected European consumption and manufacturing. This book provides a full comparative and connective study of Asia’s trade with a range of European countries. Its themes relate closely to issues of fine manufacturing and luxury goods in the current age of globalization. Goods from the East brings together established scholars, such as Jan de Vries, Om Prakash and Josh Gommans, and a new generation of researchers, who together look into the connections between European consumer cultures and Asian trade.

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Any Excuse to Squeeze in a Pic of a Chinese Parasol – Shooting Stars (1928)

Posted: August 28th, 2015 | No Comments »

The Archive gala screening at the 59th BFI London Film Festival on Friday 16th October 2015 at the Odeon Leicester Square, will be the world premiere of a new restoration of Anthony Asquith’s Shooting Stars (1928). Nothing to do with China, but I do like a restored old film and….wait for it….there’s a Chinese parasol in the flick….and I never miss a chance to post a pic of a Chinese parasol.

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Lentheric’s Shanghai Modernized Oriental Frangrance of 1936

Posted: August 27th, 2015 | No Comments »

Depending on when you visited Shanghai, where you went and how well you lived probably determines how you think Shanghai smells…

Those who know Shanghai of course won’t be surprised to know it was basically a knock off – Shanghai by Lentheric: launched in 1936 but was originally named Cœur de Paris and had been launched in 1911. Cœur de Paris was renamed Shanghai in 1936 and repackaged in a beautiful Chinese urn styled vase (with very 1930s bakelite cap). Old wine; new bottles – if you see what I mean. But still it looked lovely and, even if it was an old perfume brought back in new packaging, who could resist?

The big question – how did it smell? Well the Lenthric blog tells us here – and has more pictures of the packaging….

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